Related posts tagged with Chevy Volt

Indianapolis Sets National Example in Launching "Freedom Fleet"

Posted 4:17 PM by

Indianapolis Sets National Example in Launching “Freedom Fleet”


Mayor Ballard Introduces Nation’s Largest Municipal Electrified Vehicle Fleet That Will Reduce Oil Dependence and Save Taxpayers Millions


INDIANAPOLIS – The City of Indianapolis will deploy the largest municipal fleet of electrified vehicles in the nation by early 2016, reduce our country’s dependence on oil, and save taxpayers millions of dollars under a new program detailed today by Mayor Greg Ballard. Through the initiative with Vision Fleet the City will upgrade 425 non-police pursuit sedans to plug-in hybrid and pure electric vehicles, cut the size of the fleet by 100 vehicles, and save $8.7 million over ten years. 

“This is a landmark step in revitalizing our aging fleet and replacing expensive internal combustion engine vehicles with cutting-edge EV technology, all while reducing our dependence on oil and saving Indianapolis taxpayers thousands in fuel costs each year,” said Mayor Ballard. “America’s dependence on oil ties our national and economic security to a highly-unpredictable, cartel-influenced global oil market. Diversifying the types of vehicles and fuels available to our drivers offers our city protection from often-volatile oil prices and better prepares us for the future.”

In partnership with Indianapolis, Vision Fleet developed an innovative financing structure that bundles together all the expenses of purchasing, fueling, and maintaining the electric vehicles into a guaranteed rate that is lower cost than Indianapolis’ gasoline sedans.  Additionally, to unlock maximum savings for the City, Vision Fleet will utilize its comprehensive suite of technology, data analytics, and operational support designed specifically for reducing the cost of ownership of alternatively fueled vehicles.

The new Indy fleet vehicles will include 100% electric models, such as the Nissan LEAF, as well as plug-in hybrid models like the Chevrolet Volt and the Ford Fusion Energi, which offer extended range. The cars will be distributed throughout the fleet based on the needs of city fleet drivers and their departments, and be branded as Indy’s “Freedom Fleet”.  The City will replace 100 vehicles by the end of this year and 425 vehicles by the beginning of 2016. Each gasoline powered sedan in Indy’s fleet would have cost taxpayers approximately $9,000 per year over the next decade, including purchase, fuel, maintenance and insurance. Freedom Fleet vehicles will cost approximately $7,400 per year over that period; saving taxpayers approximately $1,600 per year per vehicle.

“This project will have enormous impacts on fuel consumption and fleet service costs,” said Vision Fleet CEO Michael Brylawski. “The first 14 plug-in hybrids deployed in Indianapolis’ Freedom Fleet have each saved an average of 53 gallons of gasoline per month. Each of the 425 EVs deployed by the beginning of 2016 will save at least 550-600 gallons of gas annually. Over the next 10 years, we expect Indianapolis will avoid 2.2 million gallons of expensive gasoline. Fuel costs for the new EVs will be about one-third of the old gas vehicles costs as a result.”

In addition to the projected savings, the city is doing its part to contribute to improved American energy security by reducing its dependence on oil, putting distance between the American economy and often-unstable global oil market.  In 2012, Indy became the first city in America to pledge to convert its city fleet to post-oil technology when Mayor Ballard signed an Executive Order mandating the change by 2025.  A year later the Mayor received the “E-Visionary Award” by the World Electric Vehicle Association for his leadership in promoting electric vehicles as a national security issue.

“The United States spends up to $83 billion annually on safeguarding global oil supply, putting American lives at risk and limiting our ability to conduct effective foreign policy,” said Marine Corps General James T. Conway (ret.), who spoke at the launch event. “I commend Indianapolis and Mayor Ballard for their forward-looking leadership that will save taxpayers money, reduce the city’s dependence on oil, and contribute to the overall improvement of our nation’s energy security. This is a model for cities across the country, and one I hope will proliferate in the coming months and years.”

The “Freedom Fleet,” the first of its kind in the nation, represents an important leadership opportunity for cities across the country. Municipal fleets, major automobile purchasers in their own right, can find significant cost savings in transitioning their inventories to EVs, all while cutting their oil consumption and reducing American dependence on this resource currently responsible for powering 92 percent of the transportation sector at a cost of nearly $900 billion annually.

About Vision Fleet
Vision Fleet is a full-service accelerator of large-scale alternative fuel vehicle (AFV) adoption in America’s fleets. Vision Fleet accomplishes this through its innovative “Clean Miles Solution,” which combines financing innovations from the solar and energy efficiency markets (Vision Fleet Capital) with comprehensive technological capabilities (Vision Fleet iQ) and operational support (Vision Fleet Assist) that are designed specifically for alternative fuel vehicles. Vision Fleet enables fleets to smoothly achieve ambitious AFV objectives at low, predictable costs and far faster than previously possible. Vision Fleet’s first project consists entirely of electric vehicles and is the largest ever deployment of electric vehicles in a public fleet (425 plug-in hybrid electric vehicles and battery electric vehicles). Vision Fleet has offices in California, Colorado and Indiana and is backed by Vision Ridge Partners, a sustainability-oriented investment firm based in Boulder, Colorado. For more information, please visit VisionFleet.us.


###

Source: Office of Mayor Greg Ballard - City of Indianapolis

MEDIA CONTACTS:
Marc Lotter
Communications Director
Office of Mayor Greg Ballard – City of Indianapolis
Marc.Lotter@indy.gov C: (317) 726¬-6589
www.indy.gov - Facebook - Twitter - Flickr

Will St. Clair
Vision Fleet
(541) 914¬-0706
will@visionfleet.us

link
e-mail
| comments (0)

RELEASE: Lafayette Installs Green Technology with Duke Energy, ESN's Project Plug-IN

Posted by


Photo: Lafayette Mayor Tony Roswarski at site of two new EV charging stations in Lafayette Parking Garage, along with new LED lighting.

Photo courtesy of Duke Energy

 

April 9, 2012

News Release


LAFAYETTE, Ind. – The city of Lafayette hosted a news conference Monday, April 9, in the Lafayette Parking Garage, 18 N. Fifth St., to showcase the garage’s new LED lighting and two recently installed electric vehicle charging stations.

“The LED lighting and these charging stations are two more environmentally sound steps the city of Lafayette is taking as we continue to lead and model green initiatives,” Lafayette Mayor Tony Roswarski said.

In all, the city is installing 148 new light fixtures. LED fixtures are replacing 23 fluorescent exit signs and 93 pendulum, 24 pole-mounted and six wall-pack metal halide lighting fixtures. Also, two 8-foot, 2-lamp T12 fixtures with be replaced with four 2-lamp T8 fixtures.

The expense for the replacement fixtures was $121,438, fully funded by an Energy Efficiency Block Grant from the U.S. Department of Energy. The city expects its annual cost savings on electricity to be about $4,000 with the LED lighting.

A Chevrolet Volt, brought to the garage by representatives of Lafayette’s DeFouw Chevrolet and BMW Inc., was used to demonstrate the new charging stations.

“Lafayette is the first municipality in the Duke Energy Project Plug-IN program to receive charging stations,” said Kevin Johnston, Duke Energy Indiana northwest Indiana district manager.

Duke Energy has also installed 43 residential charging stations, another 10 at Indiana state parks and two workplace charging locations.

“As part of Project Plug-IN, we will continue to install residential units as customers purchase electric vehicles,” Johnston said. “We are also in the process of installing additional public charging units in other Indiana cities as well as several retail locations.”

John Christodoulakis, owner of Lafayette’s Red Seven restaurant and a member of the Lafayette Parking Commission, gave the garage improvements a thumbs-up.

“As more electric vehicles come on the market, it’s important to downtown businesses that there be public charging stations available,” he said. “The installation of these stations reflects our city’s foresight and interest, too, in environmentally sound practices. As the hub of Lafayette’s dining and night life, downtown will be well served by the addition of these charging stations.”

The two Siemens level 2 charging stations are part of a two-year pilot program by Duke Energy, which owns them and will operate and monitor them. The program’s purpose is to demonstrate a commercial-scale station and evaluate load profiles, grid impacts and equipment function.

There was no cost to the city for the stations or installation, and at the end of the two years, Duke Energy will give the stations to the city.

The stations, located near the interior stair wells on the first and second floors, can each accommodate one car at a time.

Equipment was provided through Energy Systems Network’s Project Plug-IN initiative, which received American Recovery and Reinvestment Act grant funding through the Indiana Office of Energy Development to expand charging infrastructure.

“By studying customers’ charging habits, we will better understand how personal electric vehicles will integrate into the grid,” Johnston said. “Knowing what amount of charging occurs during peak demand times and what electric vehicle owners expect from their charging experience will help us maintain overall reliability while minimizing costs for all customers.

“Our mission is to provide affordable, reliable and increasingly clean energy to our customers,” Johnston said. “We are pleased to partner with Project Plug-IN as we work to understand electric vehicles and their impact to the power grid, which is a critical part of achieving that goal.”

Dennis Carson, director of the city’s Economic Development Department, said, “The city of Lafayette is always eager to consider and implement green initiatives. This pilot program is especially appealing because it places charging stations in a public venue.”

Built in 1997, the three-story Lafayette Parking Garage has 480 parking spaces.
Customers interested in purchasing an electric vehicle can learn more about Duke Energy’s pilot program at www.duke-energy.com/plugin/ProjectPlugin.asp.

Besides a long-running recycling program, other green initiatives by the city include the LEED-certified renovation of the building at 515 Columbia St., which houses the city’s Economic Development Department. A portion of that building also has a green roof.

Source: City of Lafayette




 

link
e-mail

RELEASE: Lafayette Installs Green Technology with Duke Energy, ESN's Project Plug-IN

Posted 7:57 PM by


Photo: Lafayette Mayor Tony Roswarski at site of two new EV charging stations in Lafayette Parking Garage, along with new LED lighting.

Photo courtesy of Duke Energy

 

April 9, 2012

News Release


LAFAYETTE, Ind. – The city of Lafayette hosted a news conference Monday, April 9, in the Lafayette Parking Garage, 18 N. Fifth St., to showcase the garage’s new LED lighting and two recently installed electric vehicle charging stations.

“The LED lighting and these charging stations are two more environmentally sound steps the city of Lafayette is taking as we continue to lead and model green initiatives,” Lafayette Mayor Tony Roswarski said.

In all, the city is installing 148 new light fixtures. LED fixtures are replacing 23 fluorescent exit signs and 93 pendulum, 24 pole-mounted and six wall-pack metal halide lighting fixtures. Also, two 8-foot, 2-lamp T12 fixtures with be replaced with four 2-lamp T8 fixtures.

The expense for the replacement fixtures was $121,438, fully funded by an Energy Efficiency Block Grant from the U.S. Department of Energy. The city expects its annual cost savings on electricity to be about $4,000 with the LED lighting.

A Chevrolet Volt, brought to the garage by representatives of Lafayette’s DeFouw Chevrolet and BMW Inc., was used to demonstrate the new charging stations.

“Lafayette is the first municipality in the Duke Energy Project Plug-IN program to receive charging stations,” said Kevin Johnston, Duke Energy Indiana northwest Indiana district manager.

Duke Energy has also installed 43 residential charging stations, another 10 at Indiana state parks and two workplace charging locations.

“As part of Project Plug-IN, we will continue to install residential units as customers purchase electric vehicles,” Johnston said. “We are also in the process of installing additional public charging units in other Indiana cities as well as several retail locations.”

John Christodoulakis, owner of Lafayette’s Red Seven restaurant and a member of the Lafayette Parking Commission, gave the garage improvements a thumbs-up.

“As more electric vehicles come on the market, it’s important to downtown businesses that there be public charging stations available,” he said. “The installation of these stations reflects our city’s foresight and interest, too, in environmentally sound practices. As the hub of Lafayette’s dining and night life, downtown will be well served by the addition of these charging stations.”

The two Siemens level 2 charging stations are part of a two-year pilot program by Duke Energy, which owns them and will operate and monitor them. The program’s purpose is to demonstrate a commercial-scale station and evaluate load profiles, grid impacts and equipment function.

There was no cost to the city for the stations or installation, and at the end of the two years, Duke Energy will give the stations to the city.

The stations, located near the interior stair wells on the first and second floors, can each accommodate one car at a time.

Equipment was provided through Energy Systems Network’s Project Plug-IN initiative, which received American Recovery and Reinvestment Act grant funding through the Indiana Office of Energy Development to expand charging infrastructure.

“By studying customers’ charging habits, we will better understand how personal electric vehicles will integrate into the grid,” Johnston said. “Knowing what amount of charging occurs during peak demand times and what electric vehicle owners expect from their charging experience will help us maintain overall reliability while minimizing costs for all customers.

“Our mission is to provide affordable, reliable and increasingly clean energy to our customers,” Johnston said. “We are pleased to partner with Project Plug-IN as we work to understand electric vehicles and their impact to the power grid, which is a critical part of achieving that goal.”

Dennis Carson, director of the city’s Economic Development Department, said, “The city of Lafayette is always eager to consider and implement green initiatives. This pilot program is especially appealing because it places charging stations in a public venue.”

Built in 1997, the three-story Lafayette Parking Garage has 480 parking spaces.
Customers interested in purchasing an electric vehicle can learn more about Duke Energy’s pilot program at www.duke-energy.com/plugin/ProjectPlugin.asp.

Besides a long-running recycling program, other green initiatives by the city include the LEED-certified renovation of the building at 515 Columbia St., which houses the city’s Economic Development Department. A portion of that building also has a green roof.

Source: City of Lafayette



 

link
e-mail
| comments (0)

Thoughts on GM Volt’s Recent “Rapid Thermal Expansion” Incident… by John Waters, ESN Technical Advisory Council Member

Posted by

This blog entry was written by John Waters, ESN Technical Advisory Council Member, on Rocky Mountain Institute's RMI Outlet blog. To view the original post, please visit the RMI Outlet website.

*******************************************************************************

John Waters

President - Waters & Associates Consulting

November 30, 2011

 

 

 

 

General Motors is on its way to becoming the premier automaker in all technology related to electric vehicle safety and reliability. The recent reporting and follow-up investigation of a National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) event involving a Chevy Volt (plug-in hybrid electric vehicle) is the ideal catalyst for driving EV technology forward and our global understanding of safety, reliability, and cost in advanced vehicles.

It is reported that the battery of a GM Chevy Volt, damaged in a crash test, caught fire three weeks later and ignited several cars near the Volt (this all took place in a NHTSA facility). The good news here is that no human was hurt. The incident took place at a test facility where catastrophic situations are supposed to be generated. (For more on this topic see “Volt fire investigation — is it more than smoke?”)

Now, this single incident will motivate and drive some of the finest engineers in the world to become even more skilled and insightful in advancing the benefits lithium battery technology. From Newton to Edison to Dean Kamen, true inventors highlight their increased understanding of physical laws through “mistakes” as opposed to successes.

If you asked Dean Kamen (one of the greatest living inventors) to name an individual who knows more than most of the causes of “rapid thermal expansion” of lithium batteries, he would most likely mention my name. I arrived at Dean’s offices one day several years ago, greeted by three fire trucks, and smelled the familiar fragrance of burned lithium batteries wafting through the air.

Without disclosing the details, I can confidently state that the following six months of root cause failure investigation of my team’s lithium batteries taught me more about the behavior and control of high energy lithium-ion battery packs than all the previous years of robust failure testing and analysis on the battery systems.

The Chevy Volt incident will drive the highly competent engineers and scientists at GM to discover and quantify the peripheral behavior mechanisms of high-energy battery packs. These discoveries are not ones to avoid but to embrace as they will provide substantial value for GM and propel it to a global leadership position.

As my friend (Rocky Mountain Institute chief scientist) Amory Lovins once encouraged me in an email, “Pioneers get the arrows, settlers get the land.”

GM’s leadership in putting thousands of Chevy Volts on the road—all with no reported incidents—requires the company to embrace the unknown, resolve the failure modes, and capture market share with its robust understanding and intellectual property that will be gained by leading discovery. This is our classic American heritage and we should be championing our industrious companies forward in their global leadership positions.

Those who want to promote a “sky is falling” attitude on advanced automotive technology should break out their abacuses and go for it (but be careful of pinching your fingers with the deadly motions of those beads!). Does anyone want to debate the safety and reliability of sitting on top of 20-gallon gasoline reservoir, which has an energy density 65 times greater than lithium batteries?

The loss of the space shuttle Columbia was a historical event for our country — resulting in the loss of human lives. The failure was attributed to a loose piece of foam insulation, the size of a small briefcase, which damaged the shuttle's thermal protection system.

Similar to NASA’s focus and leadership after this horrendous event, GM has the opportunity to show the world how safe and reliable lithium battery systems can be and create the intellectual property that will propel them to a global leadership position and the planet’s authority on advanced automotive technology.

---

John Waters, an entrepreneurial and business development professional, is president of Waters & Associates Consulting. He is an electric vehicle pioneer, having led development and production for General Motors of battery packs for the company's first electric cars, the EV1 and Electric S-10. At Delphi Corp., he launched a lithium battery business and was responsible for the design, testing and production of multiple lithium battery products, including battery packs for the Segway. He launched Bright Automotive in 2008 after serving as Vice President of Transportation at Rocky Mountain Institute, a role in which he provided energy strategy for Fortune 100 companies including Alcoa, Ford and Wal-Mart.

link
e-mail

Thoughts on GM Volt’s Recent “Rapid Thermal Expansion” Incident… - John Waters, ESN Technical Advisory Council Member

Posted 2:42 PM by

This blog entry was written by John Waters, ESN Technical Advisory Council Member, on Rocky Mountain Institute's RMI Outlet blog. To view the original post, please visit the RMI Outlet website.

*******************************************************************************

John Waters

President - Waters & Associates Consulting

November 30, 2011

 

 

General Motors is on its way to becoming the premier automaker in all technology related to electric vehicle safety and reliability. The recent reporting and follow-up investigation of a National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) event involving a Chevy Volt (plug-in hybrid electric vehicle) is the ideal catalyst for driving EV technology forward and our global understanding of safety, reliability, and cost in advanced vehicles.

It is reported that the battery of a GM Chevy Volt, damaged in a crash test, caught fire three weeks later and ignited several cars near the Volt (this all took place in a NHTSA facility). The good news here is that no human was hurt. The incident took place at a test facility where catastrophic situations are supposed to be generated. (For more on this topic see “Volt fire investigation — is it more than smoke?”)

Now, this single incident will motivate and drive some of the finest engineers in the world to become even more skilled and insightful in advancing the benefits lithium battery technology. From Newton to Edison to Dean Kamen, true inventors highlight their increased understanding of physical laws through “mistakes” as opposed to successes.

If you asked Dean Kamen (one of the greatest living inventors) to name an individual who knows more than most of the causes of “rapid thermal expansion” of lithium batteries, he would most likely mention my name. I arrived at Dean’s offices one day several years ago, greeted by three fire trucks, and smelled the familiar fragrance of burned lithium batteries wafting through the air.

Without disclosing the details, I can confidently state that the following six months of root cause failure investigation of my team’s lithium batteries taught me more about the behavior and control of high energy lithium-ion battery packs than all the previous years of robust failure testing and analysis on the battery systems.

The Chevy Volt incident will drive the highly competent engineers and scientists at GM to discover and quantify the peripheral behavior mechanisms of high-energy battery packs. These discoveries are not ones to avoid but to embrace as they will provide substantial value for GM and propel it to a global leadership position.

As my friend (Rocky Mountain Institute chief scientist) Amory Lovins once encouraged me in an email, “Pioneers get the arrows, settlers get the land.”

GM’s leadership in putting thousands of Chevy Volts on the road—all with no reported incidents—requires the company to embrace the unknown, resolve the failure modes, and capture market share with its robust understanding and intellectual property that will be gained by leading discovery. This is our classic American heritage and we should be championing our industrious companies forward in their global leadership positions.

Those who want to promote a “sky is falling” attitude on advanced automotive technology should break out their abacuses and go for it (but be careful of pinching your fingers with the deadly motions of those beads!). Does anyone want to debate the safety and reliability of sitting on top of 20-gallon gasoline reservoir, which has an energy density 65 times greater than lithium batteries?

The loss of the space shuttle Columbia was a historical event for our country — resulting in the loss of human lives. The failure was attributed to a loose piece of foam insulation, the size of a small briefcase, which damaged the shuttle's thermal protection system.

Similar to NASA’s focus and leadership after this horrendous event, GM has the opportunity to show the world how safe and reliable lithium battery systems can be and create the intellectual property that will propel them to a global leadership position and the planet’s authority on advanced automotive technology.

---

John Waters, an entrepreneurial and business development professional, is president of Waters & Associates Consulting. He is an electric vehicle pioneer, having led development and production for General Motors of battery packs for the company's first electric cars, the EV1 and Electric S-10. At Delphi Corp., he launched a lithium battery business and was responsible for the design, testing and production of multiple lithium battery products, including battery packs for the Segway. He launched Bright Automotive in 2008 after serving as Vice President of Transportation at Rocky Mountain Institute, a role in which he provided energy strategy for Fortune 100 companies including Alcoa, Ford and Wal-Mart.

link
e-mail
| comments (0)

Emerging Technology Day Hosts One of Nation's Largest EV Rallies

Posted 10:18 AM by

On May 7th, the Indianapolis Motor Speedway's Emerging Technology Day hosted over 70 plug-in electric vehicles at the track during the EV Rally.

Dominated by 28 THINK City EV's (predominately provided through ESN's Project Plug-IN) and about 20 Chevy Volts that had been test driven all day, plug-in vehicle owners brought their cars to the track to take a couple laps around the IMS oval.

Plug-in vehicles lined up in one of the on-site parking lots and by late afternoon, all PEV owners joined each other to prepare for their parade laps.

 

Many of the THINK City EVs that participated in the rally were purchased by participants in ESN's Project Plug-IN EV deployment initiative, which was supported by grant funding provided through the State of Indiana and the Indiana Office of Energy Development. Many of the PEV owners got to look at different vehicles, some coming as far away as Florida and South Carolina, to get an idea of what other PEV products are out there - the popular ones and the less traditional ones.

 

Everyone got to pause at the "yard of bricks" for a group photo, which can be seen on the IMS Flickr page here. Overall, being part of the EV Rally was a great opportunity for PEV owners to talk to each other about their vehicles and the new technology that made them possible, while turning heads at their quiet laps around the IMS track in the process.

link
e-mail
| comments (1)

© 2012 ENERGY SYSTEMS NETWORK • 111 MONUMENT CIRCLE, SUITE 1800 • INDIANAPOLIS, IN 46204
Website Content Management by Marketpath CMS